Green Videos and Green Tips for the Green Movement

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Does the U.S. Have Abundant Shale Gas Resources?

Posted on 21st February, by Craig Zamary in Uncategorized. No Comments

Of the natural gas consumed in the United States in 2010, almost 90% was produced domestically; thus, the supply of natural gas is not as dependent on foreign producers as is the supply of crude oil, and the delivery system is less subject to interruption. The availability of large quantities of shale gas should enable the United States to consume a predominantly domestic supply of gas for many years and produce more natural gas then it consumes.

Source: US DEPT OF ENERGY

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US Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity

Posted on 21st February, by Craig Zamary in Uncategorized. No Comments

We have been receiving a large number of emails regarding natural gas, and we would like to provide our readers with the hard data and sources to help form a more educated opinion about Natural Gas. Below is a map from the US Dept of Energy showing the 2011 Natural Gas Capacity Pipelines with additional data below the photo. Please weigh in, let us know your thoughts on this subject.

 

The U.S. Energy Information Administration estimates that U.S. natural gas pipeline companies added about 2,400 miles of new pipe to the grid as part of over 25 projects in 2011. New pipeline projects entered service in parts of the U.S. natural gas grid that can be congested: California, Florida, and parts of the Northeast (see map above). Only a portion of this capacity serves incremental natural gas use; most of these projects facilitate better linkages across the existing natural gas grid.

By convention, the industry expresses annual capacity additions as the sum of the capacities of all the projects completed in that year. By this measure, the industry added 13.7 billion cubic feet per day (Bcf/d) of new capacity to the grid in 2011. The six largest projects put into service in 2011 added 1,553 miles and about 8.2 Bcf/d of new capacity to the system. Much of this new capacity is for transporting natural gas between states rather than within states. Golden Pass, Ruby Pipeline, FGT Phase VIII, Pascagoula Expansion, and Bison Pipeline projects added 6.1 Bcf/d, or about 80%, of new state-to-state capacity.

Natural gas pipeline capacity additions in 2011 were well above the 10 Bcf/d levels typical from 2001-2006, roughly the same as additions in 2007 and 2010, but significantly below additions in 2008 and 2009 (see chart below). Capacity added in 2008 and 2009 reflected a mix of intrastate and interstate natural gas pipeline expansions, related mostly to shale production, liquefied natural gas (LNG) terminals, and storage facilities.

Source: US Department of Energy

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Energy 101: Wind Turbines (Video)

Posted on 5th January, by Craig Zamary in Uncategorized. No Comments

Wind comes from the sun heating Earth’s atmosphere, the rotation of the earth, and the earth’s surface irregularities. Wind turbines are rotary devices that convert the kinetic energy of the wind into mechanical energy, producing clean, zero-emission electricity. This video explains the basics of how wind turbines operate to produce clean power from an abundant, renewable resource—the wind.

For more information on the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy’s Wind research, see the Wind and Water Power Program’s Wind Energy Technologies Web page.

 

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